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The fact that so many people now require the validation of science for proof of nature’s benefits—that is, proof of the obvious and ineffable—seems strange to me. Yet when viewed in the context of what animal communicator Anna Breytenbach calls “separation sickness,” it makes sense.

Our lack of involvement with nature and the increasingly common view that its sole purpose is serving human beings is destroying our world. Corporate abuses are certainly obvious: oil pipelines that are peppered with leaks that poison land and water, pharmaceuticals thoughtlessly dumped into drinking water, poisonous chemicals from mining operations, and radiation from nuclear waste—the list is endless. Yet what we tend to overlook is our own daily contributions to the planet’s demise: our over-reliance on plastic straws, bottles, and shopping bags; our failing to recycle religiously; our refusal to switch from gas guzzling cars to electric ones; trophy hunters and researchers’ complete disregard for the pain and suffering they needlessly inflict on animals.

Then there are the children who are nature-deprived. They are so insulated in urban environments that when they are first brought to the outdoors, they feel anxious and fearful. Instead of exploring the natural world by examining bugs, lizards, and the curious behavior of squirrels, they recoil from it, unsure of how to relate to it. It takes days for many of these children to enjoy the calm and quiet because the buzz of the city refuses to release its death grip on them. Luckily, most children, when exposed, develop a connection to nature. They are brought to life and excited by the endless riches available for them to discover.

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Throughout my life, I have sought out the company of animals, and they have also sought out mine. When I was in my 20s, my mother took me to Baja California, Mexico, for a whale watching expedition. Fortunately for the wildlife, the area had been dedicated as a nature preserve with limited access. Our group was alone with several guides, a few biologists, and hundreds—if not thousands—of gray whales. These beautiful, mammoth creatures had traveled thousands of miles south to the warm waters of Mexico to mate and give birth to their calves.

Every day we would take excursions out into the bay in tiny wooden skiffs. Six of us would crowd into each of the little boats like sardines, and our guide would row us out among the whales. The grays’ exhales could be heard for miles. Spouts of ocean water flew into the air like geysers, and when the whales were close enough, the spray of saltwater rained down on us. For days, we sat among these enormous creatures, patiently watching as they rolled and played on the surface. Occasionally, they lifted their massive bodies into the air as they breached the water. These dramatic and playful displays took our breath away.

If we were lucky, we would see mothers push their newborn calves to the surface of the water to help them breathe. It was amazing to behold these precious little ones—each about thirteen feet long—as they learned to navigate the ocean while bulking up on their mother’s milk, preparing for the long trek northward. On the third day, a whale with a white tail playfully scooped some water and hurled it toward us. I spontaneously clapped for her while the others looked concerned, as though she might lob her enormity on top of us at any minute. For three days, she splashed us every time we would go out into the bay. But on the fourth day, after her white tail did its deed, I saw her dive, tail poised in the air. Her calf dived with her, and the next thing I knew she was underneath us, skillfully lifting up the skiff and all its passengers on her back.

I laughed with delight as the other passengers clutched the boat’s railing, holding on for dear life until she gently lowered the skiff back into the water. Struck by the pure joy of the unexpected event, I found myself mentally sending her a “thank you” for her playful antics. With my eyes closed, I pictured my gratitude landing directly in her thoughts, and when my eyes opened, she was right by my side. Instead of placing her body between her precious calf and me, she nudged him to me so I could touch him. As I reached out my hand, she rolled over onto her side, and our eyes met. The depth of her soul reverberated inside of me. The interchange was vital and honest; there was something so pure in her gaze. She honored me with her presence; she honored me by trusting me to touch her calf. I came away changed.

Book Information

  • ISBN: 978-1546630388
  • Paperback: 242 pages
  • Digital eBook: 259 pages
  • Published: September 21, 2017
  • Publisher: CreateSpace

Beth Wilson

Beth Wilson’s books have sold over 1.4 million copies and have been translated into 12 languages. She has appeared as a regular guest on The View From the Bay (ABC-7); produced her own #1 Internet radio show, Quantum Leaps; and hosted a popular Bay Area TV show, In the Sisterhood. Wilson also worked for the U.S. Congress and served as a delegate for the U.N. Commission on the Status of Women. Beth lives in California, where she maintains a thriving coaching practice.

Contact Beth @  beth@recoveringfeministbook.com

The Recovering Feminist

Driven by a fierce love for humanity, Earth and all her inhabitants, international best-selling author Beth Wilson weaves memoir, prescient social critique and stimulating interviews with a number of today’s change agents to cast a compelling vision for reclaiming women’s true locus of power: love in action.  As a life-long advocate for women’s equality, Wilson believes it is time to forge a new path of empowerment. By exposing the insidious influence of the domination system on the women’s movement, Wilson reveals the irreparable damage that will be done if women remain tethered to this destructive trajectory. The Recovering Feminist calls upon women to engage the power of the feminine spirit—often in partnership with men—to usher in a life-affirming paradigm.

Inclusive Collaboration

A call to women and men to end the distortions caused by the domination system in order to create a whole world.

 

A summons to bring the best of ourselves to the work, in community, for a whole world.

Featured Interviews

Iceland’s presidential candidate Halla Tomasdottir

 

Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, 17-year-old indigenous climate activist and speaker at the Rio+ 20 U.N. Summit

 

Oscar-winning producer of Born Into Brothels, Geralyn Dreyfous

 

Homeboy Industries Founder, Father Greg Boyle

 

Amy Ziering, Academy Award-nominated producer of The Hunting Ground, which featured Lady Gaga singing “Til It Happens to You.”

 

And many more!

Ecology & Economics

A frank assessment of the damage done to the planet by our failure to give up domination; including stories of innovative economic systems that support the earth’s intricate biosystems.

 

Stories of innovative societies whose economies seek to nurture the well-being of the whole world.